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Periodic Table: 7th Row of Chemistry Table Completed After 4 New Elements Added

Periodic Table 7th Row of Chemistry Table Completed After 4 New Elements Added pardesi news 1459247771

The elements, 113, 115, 117 and 118, were discovered by scientists in Japan, Russia and America and are the first to be added to the table since 2011. They were verified on December 30, 2015.

Four new elements have been added to the periodic table, finally completing the Periodic table’s seventh row and rendering science textbooks around the world instantly out of date. The four super-heavy elements to be added to the periodic table include 113, 115, 117 and 118, were discovered by the scientists in Japan, Russia and America and are the first to be added to the table since 2011. In 2011, elements 114 and 116 were added.

The new elements 113, 115, 117, and 118—are considered as “superheavy”, a label provided to elements with over 104 protons.

The element 113 was discovered by Japanese researchers at the Riken institute, while the element 115 and 117 were discovered by researchers from the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The element 118 was discovered by a joint team of Dubna and Livermore researchers.

The US-based International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has reportedly initiated the process of formalizing names and symbols for these elements temporarily named as ununtrium, (Uut or element 113), ununpentium (Uup, element 115), ununseptium (Uus, element 117), and ununoctium (Uuo, element 118). 

The chemistry community is eager to see its most cherished table finally being completed down to the seventh row,” said Professor Jan Reedijk, president of the Inorganic Chemistry Division of IUPAC.

The four were verified on 30 December, 2015 by the IUPAC. Importantly, IUPAC is the global organisation that governs chemical nomenclature, terminology and measurement.

The periodic table is the most important reference point for anything in chemistry. The elements are arranged left to right and top to bottom in order of their increasing atomic number, which is the number of protons in an atom of a given element.

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Patrick Callahan

Pardesi News Reporter

Pardesi News Reporter

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