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This beautiful rendition of the Indian National Anthem will mesmerize you

This beautiful rendition of the Indian National Anthem will mesmerize you pardesi news 1459247716

The Bengali film Rajkahini's Bharoto Bhagyo Bidhata provides a mesmerizing version of the Indian national anthem, "Jana Gana Mana" or Jono Gono Mono, as it was originally written and scored by the noble laureate Rabindranath Tagore.

The Bengali film Rajkahini's Bharoto Bhagyo Bidhata provides a mesmerizing version of the Indian national anthem, "Jana Gana Mana" or Jono Gono Mono, as it was originally written and scored by the noble laureate Rabindranath Tagore.

The Indian national anthem is only the first stanza of a total of five paragraphs, which was written by Rabindranath Tagore. On 24th January 1950, Indian Constituent Assembly adopted the truncated version of Bharoto Bhagyo Bidhata song as national anthem. The original song was first sung on December 27, 1911 at the Kolkata Session of the Indian National Congress. The song was originally written in Tatsam Bengali also known as Sadhu Bhasha, considered very close to Sanskrit.

Current rendition has all five original paragraphs and has been sung by over 10 renowned artists (all Bengali singers) including Kabir Suman, Kaushiki Chakraborty, Rupankar Bagchi, Lopamudra Mitra, Rupam Islam, Babul Supriyo, Sraboni Sen, Siddharta Sankar Roy, Srikanto Acharya, Anupam Roy, Annwesha and Indraadip Das Gupta. The film, directed by the critically-acclaimed filmmaker, Srijit Mukherji has Rituparna Sengupta, Jisshu Sengupta and Saswata Chatterjee in the lead and is slated to be released on October 16 (during the popular Durga Puja festival).

Rajkahini (which translates to Tale of Kings), has taken an unconventional approach to the national anthem and has used it to portray various issues the country has faced historically during the times of partition.  With strong feminist undertones, the film provides a unique narrative of a struggle, where the prostitutes in a brothel resist the independence for the freedom to continue their work, as the line of partition was passing through their own premises. In the movie, the song interestingly begins from the second paragraph and then moves on to the first stanza.  

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Patrick Callahan

Pardesi News Reporter

Pardesi News Reporter

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